Finding Alaska Marriage License Records Provider Online

If you or anyone you may know was married in Alaska and you have a profound interest in the marital documents that comes with the union, there are ways you can access these accounts in a convenient and timely manner. Most Alaska Marriage License Records are kept at the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services in its Bureau of Vital Statistics division. Marital reports since the 1890s are housed here, although a significant number of events prior to 1930 were never recorded with the bureau. Civilians will not be able to acquire a copy of their marriage license. Instead, the agency will issue a marriage certificate that validates the event.

The details that are contained in a standard marriage certificate are the same as those found in a certified copy of a marriage license. So even though the state of Alaska does not issue a copy of the marriage license to the public, the marriage certificate that they do disseminate are just as comprehensive and accurate as a marriage license. So if marital information is what you are after, obtaining a marriage certificate at the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics is still a viable option.

If you visit the official website of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, you will find a variety of information regarding the services the state has to offer. Under the Division of Public Health page, you will find the Bureau of Vital Statistics portal, which contains details pertaining to the proper procedures and requirements in requesting a copy of a marriage certificate. The Bureau of Vital Statistics is not only responsible for marriage certificates in the state; they also maintain and disseminate births, deaths, divorces, and adoption reports.

But like any official record, vital documents are closed to the general public for a certain period of time. Birth certificates, for instance, are only available for public access a hundred years after the date of the event. Deaths, marriages and divorces become available for third party access fifty years after the fact. If the record is not yet open to the public, only authorized agencies and the next of kin can access the information. Third party requests will require a notarized consent from the next of kin or a court order before documents can be granted to the requester.

You can submit your request either by mail or through the Internet. Application forms, in PDF format, are downloadable at the Bureau of Vital Statistics page. Fill in the appropriate request form and mail it using a self-addressed stamped envelope. Don’t forget to include a personal check or money order in the amount of $25. If you have ordered additional copies of the same record, it will cost you $20 extra, on top of the $25 cost per copy.

Alternatively, autonomous record search websites are also viable options when it comes to accessing vital documents or gathering public information. For a single payment, you will have complete access to the website’s database. Whether you are after your own marital record or another individual’s, a reputable record retrieval service can help you gather the data you need in a relatively short span of time. No bureaucracies or red tape.

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